Saturday

Practical Advice for Craft Bloggers


I finally found a few minutes to sit and listen to Sister Diane's latest podcast which dispenses advice about getting started as a craft blogger. More than once (about ten times, actually) I found myself saying "Yes!" to nobody in particular because the points being made were so "on target". I'll not try to review the whole podcast but I will give you the short version of what I think are the two most important things to think about (This is me riffing on the podcast. I am not quoting Diane).

1. Value. Please give me a variety of things to be inspired by and/or some information that I can use and pass on to other folks. I'm thrilled that you have an Etsy shop and, yes, a blog is a fine way to promote it but, honestly, if I like your writing style and relate to you on a personal level, eventually I'm going to make it to your shop. You don't have to post exclusively about new things in your store. It's okay to post about other people's work, learning resources, and inspirational sites in addition to your shop listings. Same goes for Twitter. One of my favorite Tweeps is @designerpens. Know why? Because Randy is a dude who makes pens and hardly ever tweets about it. He tweets about all kinds of other interesting stuff and posts tons of cool links. Have I gone to his online pen store? You bet.

2. The blog is not about you, it's about your passion. The blogs I read on a daily basis are not personal in nature. A good blog gets its wallop from the blogger's passion and that passion can be seen permeating every post. Some of the most popular sites are like this. BoingBoing is a great example. I read it religiously and link to it often. Why? Because those people over there are awesome! I would love to be invited to a dinner party with all of them. Cory Doctorow, one of the main writers is a pretty famous author and although he does post infrequently about his books, BoingBoing is not about selling books. It's about the contributor's passion.

Okay, I'm off the soapbox. You should now head over to CraftyPod and check out the whole podcast. It's chock full of good advice and gentle encoragement. Listen here.

4 comments:

  1. Awesome! I love the way you summed this up. "If I like your writing style and relate to you on a personal level, I'll eventually make it to your shop." That's a great comment, and I wish more bloggers and social-media posters understood it.

    Thanks so much for the shout-out!

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  2. So true, right? I will always dig deeper if I'm liking somebody's posts and relating to their style. It's like a big cocktail party. Some folks are boring and insist on talking about themselves the whole night and some people are fascinating because of their varied interests and their point of view. Oh, and the best ones also ask you what you think or are interested in. The web has a lot to learn from cocktail parties it seems.

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  3. "You don't have to post exclusively about new things in your store. It's okay to post about other people's work, learning resources, and inspirational sites in addition to your shop listings."

    Agreed. I have a rule that I only post about stuff that I'm genuinely interested in - it means my blog is pretty eclectic but it works for me. Sometimes I think, 'hey, I should probably mention my own art more often' but I don't think it really matters. I don't really blog to get famous or sell work - although it would be cool if that happened - I blog because I like connecting with people and I'm a blabbermouth!

    I'm also quite prepared to just chuck out a post I'm working on if it's boring me - I figure that if it's boring me, then it's probably going to bore my readers! Enthusiasm is definitely the way to go, especially if you want to sustain a blog for a long period of time.

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