Sunday

How to Divide Anything into Equal Parts

How to Divide Anything into Equal Parts from Paul Overton on Vimeo.

25 comments:

  1. i am so mathematically disabled! awesome tip!!!!

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  2. Thanks Diane. All the high school kids I taught always loved this hack. I've been meaning to record it for awhile. Appreciate the comment!

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  3. Paul, DUDE, that's a fabulous tip...I'm off to post this on FB & my blog & twitter

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  4. What quilting ruler are you using in the video? It looks like a great tool.

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  5. Bridget - Aw, thanks. Glad it was useful.

    Rhiannon - Wow, you got me. I'm not sure. I got it at a local fabric store. I'll take a look when I'm in the studio tomorrow.

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  6. Genius! Paul, you have also inspired me to start my own blog. I've been racking my brain forever for what to blog about. Now I know, arts and crafts. Thanks again for keeping me enlightened.

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  7. This has to be the single most interesting thing I've learned today. Thank you so much!

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  8. Jacob - My pleasure. Good luck with your blog! Let me know how I can help.

    Geneva - High praise indeed. Thanks for the nice comment!

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  9. That would be great Paul.
    Omnigrid rulers are popular among calligraphers, bookbinders and paper artists. One of them has a handy fraction conversion chart on her site:
    http://www.mootepoints.com/tips.html

    If you like paper crafts the gallery and books sections are worth a visit. FYI I have no affiliation to the site other than owning and happily making projects from some of her books.

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  10. Paul, this method is so simple yet so fantastically helpful for many different applications--it's too bad there isn't more stuff like this out there... "They" say that high schoolers are now responsible for learning 40% more information than their parents did when they graduated... I sometimes worry we've lost a lot of really useful basics like this and end up working harder than we should... You've just saved me a lot of time in all the craftwork I do... You have any more gems like this that you can share with us?

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  11. Relished - Oh, yeah. I'm going to make this a series. A lot of the tricks I used as a carpenter apply to just about everything. Thanks for the nice comment! 'Tis much appreciated.

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  12. Tooooo Easy! How have I lived my entire life so far not knowing that?

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  13. Louise - I felt the same way when I discovered it and have been using it and passing it on ever since. Thanks for the nice comment!

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  14. I too find it hard to believe I've managed to get by without knowing this.

    Thanks many times.

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  15. Felix - My pleasure. Glad you found it useful! Thanks for the comment!

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  16. If you don't have a square you can put a line parallel using the same techniquedirectly beneath the first and mark it off again, now you will have two points of reference for each dividing line, no need for a square just rule through both points

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  17. To follow up Felix,

    Even better than a parallel line, just do the same technique starting from the bottom left corner going up to the top right, hitting a 4 and 8" mark. That will not only give you 2 points under each other to use any basic ruler to create a vertically line...but will also give you two points to connect horizontally, in case you need to divide the paper into ninths.
    Barry

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  18. Anonymous and Barry - Thanks for improving the hack! You guys rule.

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  19. That was cool. The wife will love it -- and me too. :)

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  20. Anon - Thanks! Glad you found it useful!

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  21. It's based on the intercept theorem of Thales of Miletus...(For the sake of history) :)

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  22. Anon- I love knowledge! Thanks for the history lesson. Awesome!

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  23. Whether Thales of Miletus or Diabetes Mellitus, sometimes it's better to just haul out the ruler and find the x.33 (in this case) mark.

    Dude, save the hacks for the complicated stuff.

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  24. Hey Dude, you used pencil and paper! How refreshing. Love it!

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  25. That's a pretty cool tip but I need to split a sheet of paper into 20 sections. Should I just use the centimeter mark or something?

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