Friday

Cycling Cap Tutorial




Cycling Cap Tutorial from Paul Overton on Vimeo.

Yes, it's finally here. But first, before you watch it, a warning. It was about 105 degrees in the studio when I filmed this, therefore, I am totally out of my mind during the whole thing. Also, there are ZERO production values in this tute. I'm drowning at my real job at the moment and decided to skip the fancy titles and music in favor of just getting the information out there. Also, it's epically long at just under 23 minutes. That's not to say that the information isn't good. I think I covered everything pretty well. Finally, if you're an experienced stitcher, you can probably skip the tute all together, download the pattern and just get on with it. Resources below...

Download Hat Pattern Here.

33 comments:

  1. Who needs to see the sweat on your face when one can see it dripping all over the table?

    Seriously, great tutorial. You've inspired me to bust out my dusty sewing machine.

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  2. Hell, now you've made me want to buy a used sewing machine!

    Great post

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  3. Thank you!! I'm looking forward to trying this one :)

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  4. there is something so wholesome about men who sew - love you paul!

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  5. Yogurt tubs are awesome to use for the brim. They already have the perfect bill curve. Thanks for posting the tutorial. This is gonna be awesome!

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  6. Hooray! I made my first cycling cap with your help!

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jenthemeister/4822498403/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jenthemeister/4823115462/in/photostream/

    I used the brim from Panda Face's pattern and used the plastic cover from a design folder for the insert.

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  7. Your commitment to making this and WEARING a hat in 105 weather blows me away. Thank you so much for this and all the detail in the tutorial! I'll be linking. "I just happen to own a sewing machine and use it to make stuff." LOVE that!

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  8. Rachel - Thanks! It's always nice when one of my things is "one pretty thing". I appreciate it!:-)

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  9. Well Mr Dude! Nice cap. Thanks for taking the time to share- even in the heat. I'll be making a couple soon and crediting back to you!

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  10. No dinging,
    Great job from a sewing guy that used to fix parachutes, and also loves cycling,
    Cheers,
    Glenn

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  11. Thanks! I've do it, and I like it very much!!
    I've modify the brim.
    you can see it here http://www.iknit.it/cappellino-da-ciclista/
    Cheers Lizzie

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  12. Thanks so much for this. Not knowing anything about sewing, this is just what I needed to interpret the pattern.

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  13. Dave - Great! Glad it helped. Thanks for the comment!

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  14. Dave- thanks for the video! Very helpful. The only question I have is regarding sewing in the trim inside the cap. It looks as if you keep the pins in while you sew it in place, and I just don't understand how that works without sewing over the pins (very dangerous when using a machine). It worked out fine for me to pull them out as I went, but I was just curious about what you did. Thanks so much- my first cap was successful enough to wear, and I'm sure I'll just get better!

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  15. Allison - I've been sewing right over pins for years with no deleterious effects whatsoever. Why exactly is it dangerous? Broken needles? Barely ever happens.

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  16. Your tutorial was just the thing for me to modify my brim. I was having a terrible time trying to figure it out and you made it look easy! Thanks!

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  17. WAB1234 - Glad it helped! Got pictures?

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  18. Hey Paul, great tutorial. Just a heads up. The link for the patterns is no longer valid.

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  19. Delightful! My husband and son are competitive cyclists and will thoroughly enjoy these. The yogurt container is a wonderful idea. My only "but" would be...DON'T cut toward your hand with the rotary cutter! DFJP in Calgary, Alberta

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  20. Anonymous - Ah, but you see, I am a professional, meaning I can cut whichever way I please. That is, as long as my Mom isn't in the room. :-)

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  21. Thanks, it was a fun, quick project for Thing- A- Day 2011. I think I'll make another one and line it.
    http://hokeypokey.posterous.com/hats-off-to-tad

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  22. Great tutorial- thanks! I made this for my husband only I lined it. You can see it here: http://www.facebook.com/WoolyBaby

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  23. Josie,

    Nice job! Thanks for sending the pic. It's always great to know that people are having success in using the tutorials. I appreciate you taking the time...and NICE work!

    Best,

    Paul

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  24. Ok I'm going to ding you on a few of your sewing skills ;)

    When you start a seam. Sew 2-3 stitches, then stitch backwards 2-3 stitches, then continue forward. This is called 'backstitching' which will lock your seam and it won't open up over time. On some of the seams it isn't necessary but its good practice to always do it.

    When you sewed the beak on to the hat, that seam would be called an 'edge' stitch. To keep it uniform, continue that edge stitch all the way around the hat. If you have a 'blind hemmer' foot for your machine it makes it MUCH easier to do a uniform edge stitch.

    Other than those points, well done man! I'm an electrician so I can understand where you're coming from but I've been sewing longer than I've been in construction ha!

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  25. and to the comment above about sewing over pins. I've been sewing over pins for a long time. I usually take them out as I'm sewing along. I have though hit the pin with the machine needle dead on and it bent the crap out of the pin lol.

    I wouldn't consider it 'dangerous' but it can cause problems if you send the pin into the bobbin area.

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  26. i'm getting puckering at the very top of the cap. Think: condom tip. Anyone have any suggestions as to how to eliminate it?

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  27. great video - I just made one for a friend leaving on a personal bike tour - 2 things came up - didn't plan on the twill piece due to no pattern, didn't have enough of the material so improvised, and then had to redo the elastic. How do you easily size the piece of elastic? The cap was made for a woman with a smaller head. On the next one the elastic will have to extend into the two side panels. Also, we need to shorten the length of the sides for the smaller head. Great job with the video, cap came out pretty darn good for a first try. Thanks for your efforts in the sweltering heat. Much appreciated.

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  28. Hey Paul,

    Just a quick question before getting to this project... in using the yogurt container as a brim is it possible to flip the brim up like a your average cycling cap? Just wondering if the plastic is thin enough to be flipped up or if it's too rigid and will flip itself back down, haha. I suppose I could always root around and try to find a thinner or softer plastic. Thanks!

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  29. Jeff, You can totally flip it up. Works like a charm.

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  30. Great tutorial!
    My fingers are itching to get this project started at home but i'm a microsoft fool and can't open your pattern.
    Could you give instructions on how to make my own pattern.

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