Wednesday

Palette-able?

Now, listen...y'all know I'm always trying to keep it on the positive side of things here at DudeCraft (yes, okay, with the exception of stupid bicycle designs. Gah!!!) and I love me some palette construction and creative re-use, but am I the only one that thinks that this looks kind of like a cell for programmers that are being punished? Florescent lights and artless eggshell walls? Are we supposed to be digging this? I think we may be reaching a point where we rush to uplift things, simply because they are recycled and not because they are designed well. Back me up or let me have it in the comments.

via Design Boom

16 comments:

  1. While I am a big fan of recycling, palettes are not the way to go. Typically they are sprayed with all kinds of nastiness to prevent bugs and critters in shipping. They rank right up there with Spent nuclear fuel rod art.
    ~ Eric
    http://backdoorbooks.blogspot.com/

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  2. Using my mother's logic, just put in a plant and BAM! problem solved.

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  3. I don't know, it could be a neat conference room or such--Even better-- coat the tables and put them outside as picnic tables--that's what they remind me of. But definitely wouldn't want to work there for hours on end. And I'd hope they were going to do something to the walls-- but I've seen several European offices that are kinda stark white like that.

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  4. So, where do you put your stuff? This exemplifies a design philosophy that has no use for humans. One would need snowshoes to negotiate those fractured surfaces. I'm also skeptical about the reuse quotient here; those pallets look mighty fresh.

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  5. Lissy - Oh, don't get me wrong. I'm a big fan of Euro-minimalism when it comes to workspace, but I'm staunchly against an office that reminds me more of The Great Escape than a comfortable work environment. Rex - Total agreement about the usability issue. Jennifer - I love your mother's logic. Eric - Hadn't thought of the toxicity issue. I wonder how that plays out over time.

    Thanks for the comments.

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  6. The bars on the window don't help. :P
    I'm not feeling this.
    Salvaged doors as desks: yes.
    Pallets as desks? Eh.

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  7. I think you're right on target Senor Paul. The more you look at it the more it looks like it's contrived, there are too many straight lines that carry on for pallet after pallet. I'm betting that they design firm in question built those pallets. So that would mean that it might not even be recycled, but even if it were, this looks like shocking art, just for the sake of shock.

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  8. I agree with Paul, there is more to recycling or upcycling than just re-using something. I like it when someone puts more "intent" into it, makes it artful. This sort of looks like they were just stacked to be high enough for desks and they stopped there.

    Also? Knowing how clumsy I am, my shins would be scraped all the heck in a room like that, with all those exposed corners.

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  9. Couldn't agree more. Luna - I can see myself falling several times a day as I cursed my wretched upcycled work environs. Thanks for the comments!

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  10. All I can think of is how many splinters I would have to be removing at the end of the day.

    Ugh. Overhead flourescents add a nice, institutional/prison/clinic feel, too.

    Awful. Simply awful.

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  11. Yes, sorry, I agree it's a fail. A good process and intent don't guarantee success. Maybe if they were covered in pennies...

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  12. Pallets are not the best for any reuse project (aside from the mentioned toxicity possibility), the glass top doesn't fit well with it and a sheet of thick glass like that is pretty expensive - probably could have found some old wood flooring planks that could have been reused into a true desk instead of the pallet/glass.
    I think at this point a giant cable spool table would have been better (Knights of the Round Cable Spool Table?).

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  13. I can't help but wonder how this could be deemed useful to "suit the creative advertising agency". I sort of get the idea that they wanted to create a space that "invites you to stand, sit or lay down on the pallets", but I don't really find it inviting at all. As a matter of fact the hap-hazard appearance of the stacks of pallets give me a very un-peaceful, uneasy feeling and I'm afraid that they are really gonna let me down - possibly on my head. And, throw in the thick black cables strung precariously overhead; both over the desks and in the conference area and I just wanna hang myself - not feeling very creative with this one.
    Although I did like the photographic angle in the pic of the pallet stack from above (pic number 2 on the linked page).

    And the chairs are nice. :-)

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  14. On the subject of recycling- many times I see crafts and projects that simply modify a used item to look slightly different and now take up shelf space, or to be put outside where a little weathering will make it an eyesore. In my mind, it just puts its' arrival time to the landfill off for a year or two.

    More thought needs to be put into these things.

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  15. Terry - Amen. Thought is a good thing. Let's do more of that before we commit to making offcast materials into groupings of offcast materials and calling it "design".

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  16. That's the same model of chair our company switched everyone to after a building remodel. After a few weeks of fiddling with all the knobs, trying to find a semblance of comfort, I swiped one of the old chairs from the conference room to which they had been banished.

    That room makes me feel so much better about our half-walled open hex desks, though. Thank you.

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